Red-rumped Ladybird  Scymnus haemorrhoidalis

Other name: Red-rumped Scymnus

This scarce but locally abundant species of wetland habitats is distinctive when found as it has red tips to the rear of the wing cases.

Identification       Length  1.8-2.2mm

This species resembles many other Scymnus  species that are black with an orangy-red face and leading edge to the pronotum but has distinctive reddish-brown tips to the wingcases.

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Warren Hill, The Brecks, Suffolk
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Warren Hill, The Brecks, Suffolk
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Warren Hill, The Brecks, Suffolk
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Upshire, Essex
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Upshire, Essex
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Upshire, Essex
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Upshire, Essex
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Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex
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Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex
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Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex
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Warren Hill, The Brecks, Suffolk
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Upshire, Essex
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With 16-spot Ladybird
In sweep net sorting tray
Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex

Habitat

This is a wetland species and I expected to find it in marshland areas but the first one I saw was in quite a dry area. I travelled to Warren Hill, Suffolk in 2018, after Mark Hows reported several scattered over a wide area of chalk grassland. When I searched the area. I found many 16-spot and Pointed-keeled Ladybirds in the dry grassland and it wasn't until I examined a wet flush that I found my first one. The wet flush is probably the core habitat for this species, which then spreads out into dryer areas either due to drought or population growth.

The species was also present in 2019. The reserve was closed during the bird breeding season but Red-rumped Ladybird could still be seen on the access track to the side of the reserve.

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Damp flush      Warren Hill, The Brecks, Suffolk

The second one I saw was a suprise find in my recording area. I found one exiting a garden wheelie bin containing prunings of bamboo and juniper growing on the edge of a small ornamental pond in Upshire, Essex.

I saw my third in 2020, found by Mark Hows, whilst we were sweep netting in an area of dry sparse grassland at Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex.

This was found in a slightly damp flush, similar to the Warren Hill site.

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Damp flush surrounded by dry grassland
Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex

Additional Photographs

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Brightly marked rear wing cases
Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex
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Poorly marked rear wing cases
Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex
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Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex
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Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex
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Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex
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Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex
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Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex
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Fishers Green, Lee Valley, Essex

Look-alike Species

The Shining Flower Beetles Olibrus can be confused with the black Scymnus species and at least one species has a reddish rear end resembling Red-rumped Ladybird.

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Olibrus sp.        Upshire, Essex

I swept the above beetle from grassland and at first glance I thought it might be a Red-rumped Ladybird.

When I looked closer it was very glossy and the shape was wrong. The widest part of the body was towards the front with the rear end tapering towards a slight point.

As is often the case the antennae were also too long for a Scymnus  species.

Also the red on the rear end was rather extensive and there was no red on the head or front of the pronotum.